Interactive Digital Arts Exhibit, digiPlaySpace, Opens Sat. May 28 at Minnesota Children’s Museum

by | May 26, 2016 | Press Release |

digiPlaySpace is here!

digiPlaySpace features never before seen, large-scale interactive installations designed to flex kids’new media muscles

Minnesota Children’s Museum invites families, kids and kids-at-heart to digiPlaySpace™, an indoor adventure where kids control the world’s most fun and fresh collection of interactive, digital installations and learning-centric games from internationally acclaimed children’s media artists.

Room Racers designer, Lieven van Velthoven, is available to discuss his installation Thursday, May 26 – Saturday, May 28.

Lieven van Velthoven is a Dutch computer scientist/artist with a passion for new types of interaction. His work includes real-time 3D VJ visuals, an installation that traces buildings and people with light, and much more. His mixed reality racing game ‘Room Racers’ won a Jury Award at Cinekid Festival 2011, the TIFF Kids Audience Choice Award in 2012, and is on permanent display at the renowned ZKM | Museum for Contemporary Art in Germany. Room Racers, was a consistent favorite among visitors in China. His newest piece, Headrush, which is coming online with digiPlaySpace 2.0, won the People’s Choice award at TIFF last year.

digiPlaySpace runs from May 28 through mid-August.

10 Featured Interactive Installations

Flippaper by Jérémie Cortial and Roman Miletitch (France, Belgium)
This experiment, in magnet-based tangible interfaces, allows visitors create their own colorful, pinball game background. Pushing a button brings the drawing to life allowing kids to play a virtual pinball game of their own making.

Creatures by Estúdio Ruim (Chile)
Jump, dance, act and play along with curious creatures in this interactive installation where bodies and movements are transformed into hilariously cute animated characters.

Room Racers by Lieven van Velthoven (Netherlands)
Kids use everyday objects to create the racetrack and then their virtual race cars compete against each other to see who makes it past the finish line.

Please Do Not Feed the Bugs by Squidsoup (UK)
Familes are invited into a virtual ecosystem populated by strange, insect-like creatures. These creepy critters are alarmingly aware of their surroundings and all have their own distinct personalities: some are hyperactive, others are timid, lots are curious, and they all react in different ways to obstacles such as people and objects, or to a good squishing. Please Do Not Feed the Bugs was created by Squidsoup, an international group of artists, researchers and designers based in the UK, Norway and New Zealand, working with digital and interactive experiences.

Be in the Scene! by Aaron Van Domelen (Canada)
Back by popular demand, this interactive installation uses green screen technology to allow kids to be inserted into a film scene and discover the magic behind the movies.

Happy Cat Lab by Catshrine (Canada)
In this truly transformative stop-motion animation experience by Toronto-based artists, Catshrine, kids will use the cutting-edge technology of the “Change-o-Lever” to transform themselves and their friends into fantastical new creatures from their own imaginations!

Ototo Sound Lab by Dentaku (UK)
Connect anything conductive to this powerful little circuit board and create your own unique musical instrument. Build a piano out of vegetables, make a plant sing, or create a keyboard from aluminum foil.

Talk Like a Robot by Reese Brunelle (Canada)
Discover what you sound like as a robot! This interactive audio and video project lets you change the pitch, format, and tone of your voice by talking and singing into a microphone!

Cubelets by Modular Robotics (USA)
Cubelets are magnetic blocks that can be snapped together to make an endless variety of robots with no wiring or programming requires. This playfully interactive learning experience allows everyone to be a robot-maker.

Sphero Speedway by Orbotix (USA)
Sphero is much more than just a robotic ball: the Sphero platform is an entire gaming system built around a unique hardware and software combination, including many games and apps you can find online. Beyond its innovative gaming applications, Sphero also provides applications to help teach computer programming, as well as acting as an interactive sensor platform that includes a gyroscope, accelerometer, and many other features for DIY makers who love to tinker.

About Minnesota Children’s Museum

Minnesota Children’s Museum is dedicated to sparking children’s learning through play. Our vision: “Kids play more. Adults do, too.  We thrive as a happier, healthier and more innovative community through the radiant power of play.” The Museum, which first opened in 1981 and moved to downtown St. Paul in 1995, serves more than 460,000 visitors each year at its locations in St. Paul and Rochester, and reaches thousands more across the state through Smart Play Spots, Storyland exhibits and other programs. As the nation’s leading developer of traveling children’s museum exhibits, the Museum is a trailblazer in creating immersive learning environments, reaching more than 10 million children and adults in the United States, Canada and Mexico through the nation’s largest collection of children’s traveling exhibits. The Museum is consistently rated as one of the top children’s museums in the country by national media outlets such as Forbes and Parents and was named as a finalist for an Institute of Museum and Library Services Medal of Service, the nation’s highest honor conferred on museums and libraries. Follow Minnesota Children’s Museum on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and YouTube and visit our Power of Play blog.

Cubelets

Cubelets by Modular Robotics (USA)
Cubelets are magnetic blocks that can be snapped together to make an endless variety of robots with no wiring or programming requires. This playfully interactive learning experience allows everyone to be a robot-maker.

Cubelets
Flippaper

Flippaper by Jérémie Cortial and Roman Miletitch (France, Belgium)
This experiment, in magnet-based tangible interfaces, allows visitors create their own colorful, pinball game background.  Pushing a button brings the drawing to life allowing kids to play a virtual pinball game of their own making.

Talk Like a Robot

Talk Like a Robot by Reese Brunelle (Canada)
Discover what you sound like as a robot! This interactive audio and video project lets you change the pitch, format, and tone of your voice by talking and singing into a microphone!

Video

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